Measuring Tools

Art: Divination

Ruling Planet: Mercury, Uranus

Sphere: Common

The Measuring Tools dweomer skill gives the caster the means to measure every thing under the sun, great and small. It results in a dweomer that can be tuned to measure the state of time and the passage of time, weight, speed, geometric alignment

The tool to Measure Time consists of the Armillary Sphere which can be consulted by looking at the heavens when the sky is clear (only) to check, season and month of the year, week and day of month, day of week, time of day or night, phase of the moon, positions of the planets and constellations, and the like, such as commonly affect his efforts to cast magick, as well as marking Candle Hours, which aspect can be used to turn a normal candle into an instrument for measuring time, in the same manner as a normal commercially available candle marked with the hours, or to get down to fine measurements which may be needed in some cases, especially in Alchemy and Wizardry, the caster may turn to the Clock or Hour Glass aspectsto measure the passage of time in mileways or minutes.

The Measure Time tool can also be used to determine how old a creature, being, plant, beast, bottle or keg of wine or beer, a wound or scar, or the like is. Alternately, it can be set to act as a timer, to measure the passage of a certain period of time and notify the caster when the point in time he is awaiting has arrived. This is the same mechanism on which the timer or alarum magicks are based that are cast on objects such as bells or hounds to cause them to ring or bay at certain times.

The aspects of this tool will have no appreciable DUR and the dweomer will pass as soon as the caster has received the measurement in time he was seeking.

The tool to Measure Weight is divided between the Little Beam and the Great Beam which is what the scales in common use in the period of the game were called. The little beam is for lighter weights and will be sensitive to amounts as small as grains, and the great beam will measure amounts up into the tons.

The tool to Measure Speed provides some specialchallenges for roleplaying the results, insofar as the characters in their medieval gameworld have no concept of rates of speed in mph (miles per hour). This makes things awkward for the PC, insofar as those magick he may also have that affect speed are defined in terms of mph’s. The player must understand that usage to be a convention adopted for the ease of use and convenience of the GM only, however. References to speed in mph should not be made in the context of the character’s own speech, and really should be restricted to private conversations between the player and GM, or made in communications via note between them.

If the GM has the inclination and patience to do so, rates of speed as read by this Measuring Tool should be rendered in a rate, so that the caster receives an impression of the distance that can be reached relative to a known location “at this pace we could reach (X location) in (so many) hours or days, and will reach (X location) within the hour”. Another possible way of framing the result of the dweomer is “as fast as a common horse cart” or “half as fast as you can go on your horse” or “three times as fast as the average man can run”, or the like. Alternately, the GM can render the answer in terms of how far he could go in how much time – knowing that for the PC’s frame of reference it is “a week’s journey” from (point X) to (point Y), the GM could say “you would make the journey from (point X) to (point Y) in half that time if you traveled the same rate as (subject being clocked for speed by the dweomer). These answers are more meaningful in terms of the character and his world. On the other hand, in situations such as battle where the speed of a character in mph’s can modify the amount of damage he inflicts especially in Charging and Over-bearing, “mph’s” as such become a necessary evil. Whenever the use of an anachronistic term can be avoided through good roleplaying, it should be.

The tool to Measure Volume of vessels such as tankards, bushels, baskets (“frails”), barrels, and the like,whether empty or full to some degree will extend to such small common measures as a Measuring Cup and a Measuring Spoon, even measuring amounts of liquids in drams or dry ingredients in grams for accurate portioning of dosages of medicines, salves, potions or other magickal preparations whose dosages can be critical to success or determining success in their use, and also for those who are trained as Cooks to measure out ingredients perfectly in the palm of the hand, whether by the teaspoon, tablespoon, cup or portion thereof, or know exactly when he has poured a cup or pint or whathaveyou of any given liquid.

The tool to Measure Distance or Size includes the Surveyor’s Eye for longer distances and a Measuring Stick/Rod for objects small and large, even buildings. The tool to Measure Altitude is another aspect of the Measuring Rod or Stick render the caster’s elevation personally, relative to sea level, or the altitude of the top of a hill or mountain the caster is viewing, also relative to sea level OR relative to the caster’s own elevation, at his discretion. This includes the ability to Measure Depth, underwater or underground, in the same manner as elevation, rendering the depth of the caster’s position/location personally, relative to either sea level OR the nearest surface level (directly above him), or the depth of some underwater or subterranean feature the caster is viewing, also relative to sea level OR the nearest surface level (directly above him) OR relative to the caster’s own position/location. The caster will determine the points of reference that will do him the most good in each instance of the Tool’s use.

The tool to Measure Alignment & Anglesincludes the effects of an Astrolabe/Quadrant/Sextant or a Plumb Bob, Spirit Level or Square, all indispensible to the caster if he be an Astrologer as well, for taking sightings and measuring degrees and angles of celestial bodies for the purposes of drawing up charts for prognostication, or for finding lines of longitude and latitude for navigation, or the Plumb Bob, Spirit Level and Square to an Architect-Builder, Carpenter-Builder, Mason-Builder, Carpenter-Cabinetmaker/Joiner, or the like to determine if his work is truly level or exactly up-right or his work is truly square.

The tool to Measure Temperature carries much the same difficulty as that for measuring speed. The measure of temperature in degrees Fahrenheit didn’t come about until the 18th century. This makes things awkward for the PC, insofar as those magicks he may also have that affect temperature are defined in terms of degrees. The player must understand that usage to be a convention adopted for the ease of use and convenience of the GM only, however. References to temperature in degrees should not be made in the context of the character’s own speech, and really should be restricted to private conversations between the player and GM, or made in communications via note between them. The point of reference “cold enough to freeze water, and then some” might be used by the GM to bridge the difficult gap here, as appropriate. “Hot enough to fry an egg” or “hot enough to roast meat” are good phrases and points of reference, as is “hot enough to burn/char wood”. Other than these, however, the effects of extremes in temperature can be difficult to pin down and describe. Here again, where the temperature in degrees is needed to determine such things as damage, it is a necessary evil. Whenever the use of an anachronistic term can be avoided through good roleplaying, it should be.

The tool for Counting and reviewing Numbers consists basically of the Tally aspect, which will tot up a column of figures or check the answers to a page full of mathematical problems, a page in a ledger, confirm correct answers and highlight to the recipient’s vision where any discrepancies and inaccuracies in the entries lay, and the Render Count aspect, which will count large masses of objects, creatures, beings, apples in a barrel, beads in a dish, coins in a bag, and so on at a glance. This is most often used in cantrip Form to save time.

In spirit, nature, and function, this Tool is rather like a Truthsay dweomer to be applied to the language of numbers. IF the caster has the Truthsay magick as well, this magick will be considered part and parcel of it, another aspect of it when applied to pages of figures.

The finer the measure of time wanted, the greater the POT needed, so that to measure the time down to the minute would require a POT of 11. That would be 1 each for the year, the season, the reigning starsign, the month, the phase of the moon, the day of the month, the day of the week, which bells have rung most recently or are about to ring if that event is closer in time, the hour of the day by mechanical clock, the mileway of the hour, and a POT of 11 to measure the exact minute.

Minutes were really not observed in the period of the game, but this dweomer allows the caster to be as exact as he would like.

For the timer aspect, the scale on which the time is to count will determine the base POT needed, up to 11 if the caster wants to count minutes, plus the number of units the dweomer will count, so the POT needed to create a 10-minute timer would be 21.

Speed can only be measured accurately if the actual speed in mph’s is less than or equal to the POT of the Measuring Tool.

To measure large objects, distances or quantities, the dweomer must be able to encompass the target by POT as if casting the dweomer ON them – a minimum of (Size ÷ 2) in points of POT, and if measuring more than one, the largest in Size plus the number of items. To measure small, fine things, one point of POT will be needed for every step in fineness starting with that in which the substance or material is normally measured.

For example, liquids are commonly measured in gallons, so to measure in drams as is needed for dosing alchemical substances and healers’ herbs would require a POT of 6. That would be 1 each starting with gallons and counting down through quarts, pints, cups, ounces, and then drams.

The POT of these Measuring Tools should be compared to any attempts to disguise the true nature of the subject being measured, as in the case of a Glamour that disguises the true number of objects, or prevents a true sum being achieved, or an accurate measure of quality, weight, quantity/volume, or the like, and also in the case of examining the ledgers of those with the Mathematics skill who have attempted to hide embezzlement of funds.

Against any dweomer (Glamour) set to obscure the information the “Measuring Tools” are designed to quantify and reveal,a successful check on D100 will be required to get an accurate measure or count, using the “Measuring Tool” [(POT) + (MGA att. mod.)] as the AV vs. the [(POT) + (MGA att. mod.) of the deceiving dweomer, or the AV of the skill used to attempt to deceive (in the case of falsified ledgers).

The “Measuring Tool” dweomer opposes any dweomer (Glamour) set to obscure the information the “Measuring Tools” are designed to quantify and reveal.

This dweomer may not be resisted.

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